Markets

Current Market Prices
Fall 2017 Market Update
April 2017 Market Update

2016 Historical Prices
2013 dec markets October 2016 Update

2013 dec markets May 2016 Market Update

2015 Historical Prices
2013 dec markets October 2015 Market Update

2013 dec markets May 2015 Market Update

2014 Historical Prices
2013 dec markets October 2014 Market Update

2013 Historical Prices
2013 dec markets December 2013 Market Update
aug 2013 market update November 2013 Market Update
aug 2013 market update October 2013 Market Update
aug 2013 market update August 2013 Market Update
July 2013 Market Update
June markets June 2013 Market Update

2012 Historical Prices
December 2012 Market Update
November 2012 Market Update
August 2012 markets August 2012 Market Update
July 2012 Market Update
June 2012 Market Update
April 2012 Market Update
January 2012 Market Update


2011 Historical Prices
December 2011 Market Update
November 2011 Market Update
September 2011 Market Update
August 2011 Market Update
July 2011 Market Update
June 2011 Market Update
April 2011 Market Update
March 2011 Market Update
January 2011 Market Update



2010 Historical Prices
August 2010 Market Update
July 2010 Market Update
June 2010 Market Update

February 2010 Market Update
January 2010 Market Update


2009 Historical Prices
October 2009 Market Update
June 2009 Market Update
May 2009 Market Update
March 2009 Market Update
February 2009 Market Update



2008 Historical Prices
December 2008 Market Update

Market Perspective
The Canadian forage seed market is small in comparison to markets for other farm commodities. It is a less structured market. Typically, prices are established on a “bid” and “offer” system, with sellers and buyers checking offers and bids by other growers or buyers. Although market and price information can be lacking it is available. Canadian companies provided prices for most forage seed species, however, quotes can vary depending on the company, time of year, and market conditions (supply/demand).

General principles of supply and demand work in the forage seed marketplace. To alleviate potential marketing problems, the marketing of turf, grass and legumes seed in Canada has 4 marketing options available to growers. The marketing alternatives are: direct seed sales, contracts, brokered sales and farm gate sales. (Excerpts from Forage Seed Marketing)

Dave Wong, retired Market Specialist with Alberta Agriculture, has compiled many market summaries and market perspectives over the years. Here are a few examples from recent years.

Canadian Market Summaries
pdf icon Historical Grass and Legume Seed Prices: 1970 to 2016
pdf iconCanadian Grass and Legume Seed Data: 2016 Inspected Acres
pdf iconCanadian Grass and Legume Seed Data: 2015-2016 Grass and Legume Seed Export
pdf icon Canadian Grass and Legume Seed Data: 2015 Inspected Acres
pdf icon Canadian Grass and Legume Seed Data: 2014-2015 Grass and Legume Seed Export
pdf icon Historical Grass and Legume Seed Prices: 1970 to 2014
pdf iconCanadian Grass and Legume Seed Data: 2014 Inspected Acres

pdf iconCanadian Grass and Legume Seed Data: 2013-2014 Grass and Legume Seed Exports
pdf icon 2012 Canadian Grass and Legume Seed Exports
pdf icon 2012 Alfalfa Seed from Canada to Selected Countries

USA & International Market Summaries
USA Grass and Legume Seed Data: Oregon Production 2006 to 2016
USA Grass and Legume Seed Data: 2016/17 Exports
pdf icon EU Red Fescue Production (up to 2013)

pdf icon USA Grass and Legume Seed Data: 2014/2015 Exports
pdf icon USA Grass and Legume Seed Data: Oregon Production 2004 to 2014

pdf icon USA Grass and Legume Seed Data: 2013/2014 Exports
pdf icon2012 USA Census of Agriculture: Grass and Legume Seed
pdf icon USA Grass Seed Data Update March 2014
pdf icon European Union Grass and Legume Seed Update to 2012
pdf icon Oregon Grass Seed Update to 2012

For more information for 2 major crops, see
Marketing Creeping Red Fescue - October 2004
pdf icon Creeping Red Fescue Pricing Factors
Alfalfa Seed Marketing in Canada -October 2004


The Changing Marketplace
Historical price information is available for the most commonly grown turf, forage and legume seed crops of Alberta. Prices provided are yearly averages, and reflect prices given to growers. Dave Wong from AAFRD has compiled Individual graphs of historical prices for creeping red fescue, smooth bromegrass, timothy seed, alfalfa seed, sweet clover, red clover and alsike clover. Check them out with this link: Historical Forage Seed Prices in Alberta - May 2014
or the more recent tables of historical prices on the left hand side of this page.

World trade of forage grass seed, turf grass seed and legume seed revolves around 5 major players. The USA is by far the largest producer and exporter of grass and legume seed in the world. This followed by the EU15 as a whole, then Canada. New Zealand follows. The only other nations of significance are the Argentina and the Czech Republic, which has now joined the EU25.

The majority of trade is in turf grasses (perennial ryegrass, annual ryegrass, tall fescue turf varieties, Kentucky bluegrass and the fine leaved fescues. Direct subsidized to grass species in the EU have been taken off, but now the marketplace will play a major role in European growers decisions to grow grass/ legumes seeds.

The marketplace has also changed. No longer do end-users obtain supply in advance. Buyers have moved to a “hand-to-mouth” approach. This has forced growers to hold onto their production longer, thus becoming the storage component of the marketing wheel. In the grass/legume seed business, growers must decide quickly when and which crop to grow, which may also mean quicker movement of growers into and out of grass seed production.